Archive for GCSE

New GCSE Shakeup – Well Overdue!

Posted in Britain, Children, Conservative Party, English Schools, Government, Liberal Party, Primary Education, Teens, UK with tags , , , on 01/10/2011 by floroy1942

Just about everyone knows how the previous Labour government dumbed down the GCSE exams to improve the pass rate, and thereby make themselves look good. Now the pendulum has, thankfully, started to swing the other way and we are faced with a much needed shakeup of the education system.

The whole idea of GCSE exams was originally intended to seek out the brighter pupils in our schools, and give them a chance to attend university. From there they would become our next generation of entrepeneurs, scientists and academics.

Tony Blair on Education

That was until Labour got their sticky fingers in the mix and wanted to improve their popularity with the masses! During their tenure as government of the country, they successfully managed to sabotage the whole system until it became practically worthless, because everyone had an opportunity to attend the highest level of education, ‘bright’ or not!

Now, many of those who have managed to obtain a university place will never make the grade, for the simple reason they are not clever enough, a fact revealed by the numbers who no longer succeed in obtaining a degree. Don’t misunderstand me, for I know that many of our youth have worked hard, and fully deserve their place in university and I wish them success.

I have to admit to utter amazement at reports that under the coalition, GCSE pupils will now be marked for spelling, punctuation  and grammar! Once I got over my shock, I began to realize why so many of today’s youth cannot put an intelligent sentence together!

 

Pass Rate Increase Under Labour

It would appear that under Labour, the following sentence would have been acceptable on a GCSE exam paper: “Shakespeer woz a man, who rote, plays and poims b4 he dyed”. This is what happens when an important exam like this is not marked for spelling and grammar. The examiner, knowing full well the inaccuracies in the preceding statement, would have been powerless to do anything, because these mistakes were not covered in the exam. Considering the fact that it is one of the most important in a child’s education cycle, I find it incredible!

Even now, with the changes being made by Ofqual, they do not go anywhere near far enough. The new marking of spelling, punctuation and grammar will only apply to English literature, geography, history and religious studies to start with. Well, at least they said “to start with”. Hopefully, more will come! 

When I was at school, we got marked on spelling and grammar all the time, exam or not. It was drummed into us from primary school onward. Nowadays, I guess it’s not worth the effort, what with the kids growing up with ‘teen speak’ etc.

Another thing that is being curbed is the ‘re-sit’, a practice that allows pupils to re-sit exams until they either pass, or improve their marks. In my day, you got one shot at it and that was it. The ‘one shot’ tactic was again a way of ensuring only those clever enough went to university.

Hard Work - For A Now Worthless Piece Of Paper

If the current trend had continued, I could well see the day when we had people (I was going to say leaders, but that would be ridiculous) in industry and politics who could not even string an intelligent sentence together!

Thanks to our previous government, we are now seeing the emergence of a generation of young people, who in many cases, have been to all the right schools etc, but come away dumb. And do you know what the funny thing is? Many people will still vote Labour in the next election!

I do not say this as a Conservative or Liberal, for I am devoutly apolitical, and do not support any political party.

Roy.

A Bungled Education System

Posted in Britain, Budget Cuts, Children, Conservative Party, David Cameron, England, English Schools, Government, Insanity, Liberal Party, MP's, Nick Clegg, Primary Education, Primary Schools, Teens, UK, USA with tags , , , , , on 10/09/2011 by floroy1942

Lancashire Hot Pot is a type of stew in which ‘everything but the kitchen sink’ goes in the pan, and this is probably the closest we will get to describing the British educational system at the moment.

Education is one of the cornerstone’s of any modern culture, and if you mess that up, you ruin not only people’s lives, but the future of the nation. So what has gone wrong in Britain?

Well, in a nutshell – politicians! If there is a way to mess up a perfectly good working system, politicians will find it!

Yea! Right!

Up to the beginning of the 60’s, we had a system of education that worked, and gave us many of the leading scientists, entrepreneurs and academics in the world. No one could touch us for sheer brilliance, not even the United States, who lured away most of our top scientists with promises of extravagant salaries (known as The Brain Drain).

In 1965,  Anthony Crosland, Secretary of State for Education for the then Labour government, introduced comprehensive schools. This was the catalyst for the de-fragmentation of UK education. From that moment on, we saw increased diversification into faith schools, technical schools, academies etc. etc. etc.

Each successive government since then has added its own few ingredients to the stew, and now today, we have a system of complete confusion, and on the verge of total collapse.

I Expected Better

I had hoped Cameron and Co. would have done something to fix the problem after 13 years of Labour meddling, but unfortunately, they have only succeeded in making the problem much worse by introducing ‘free’ schools, adding yet another variation to an already confused system. The kids don’t know where they belong, the parents don’t know which school is best for their child,  and the education staff are in complete disarray.

The evidence for this is everywhere you look. A youth that is semi-literate and unemployable, and teachers who don’t know what time of day it is! None of the ‘old style’subjects are taught properly anymore: history, geography, religious education, physical training, chemistry, and in many cases, physics.

A modern school: Teacher: “Right class! History is about the past, geography is where places are on the map, religion is about Jesus and all that stuff. – Karen, please pick up your pen dear! – Right, you can put it down now. – That was about all exercise which we call physical training. Next is chemistry, all about chemicals, and the last one is physics which concerns – errrr! Can anyone tell me what physics has to do with? – Jeremy? – Physical things? – Well I guess that is close enough. Right class, dismissed.”

Trying Hard But Getting Nowhere!

Sorry, just couldn’t resist it! It is indeed a sad indictment, when the education system of a country is so bad, that most of the pupils leaving it read and write like eight-year-olds. Sure, the figures look good when you see a 97% pass rate for GCSE, but when you consider that a twelve-year-old from 1955 could quite possibly have sailed through it, it doesn’t really mean much, especially in today’s hi-tech world.

Maybe we will have to wait for the next government (which will probably be Labour again so don’t hold your breath) for the UK education system to be kicked back into shape. But to be honest, I very much doubt if that will happen.

I reproduce a breakdown of the UK schools from the Independant newspaper which will probably surprise you:

Schools Graphic

3,446: There are 3,446 state secondary schools in England. The vast majority (about 2,950) are comprehensive in name. There are still 164 selective grammar schools in the country and the rest are either secondary modern schools or “high” schools (effectively secondary modern schools that choose to use a different name to describe themselves).

1,300: Within that 3,446 figure, there are 1,300 academies. The difference between these and those that remain maintained by the local authority is that they have the same freedoms as independent schools to set their own curriculum, hire non-qualified teachers and run their own affairs. There are, to complicate it further, two types of academies. There are those set up under the previous Labour government which have sponsors (education charities, private providers, independent schools and universities). There are 319 sponsored academies. Under the Coalition, existing state schools – firstly those described as “outstanding” by Ofsted – were allowed to transfer to academy status. There are 981 transferred academies.

10: A further complication is that virtually every state secondary school is a specialist school, specialising in one area or another of the curriculum. (There are at least 10 types of specialist schools including languages, science, maths, arts, sports, humanities and even rural studies.)

16,884: There are also 16,884 primary schools in England. Only a handful have decided to convert to academy status.

7,000: The picture is further complicated by the fact that about one in three English state schools (primary and secondary) are faith schools. There are just under 7,000 of these. They can either be voluntary aided or voluntary controlled. If they are voluntary controlled, the diocese or faith group has a far greater say over admissions. A breakdown of the faith schools reveals that there are 6,955 Christian state schools (mainly Church of England or Roman Catholic but with a handful of Methodist schools, too), 36 Jewish, six Muslim, two Sikh, one Hindu, one Greek Orthodox and one Seventh Day Adventist.

24: To this mixture can now be added the free schools: 24 of which have opened up for the first time this September. David Cameron has said he wants this figure to rise to the early hundreds in the next few years. Once it is set up, a free school has the same freedoms as an academy. The difference is that it is a new school started by a variety of parents’, teachers’ or faith groups (or education charity). It is also possible for a free school to be a faith school, but it must offer 50 per cent of its places to non-believers – a requirement not asked of mainstream faith schools.

2,415: To add to the mix, there are 2,415 independent schools: 1,625 primary and 790 secondary. These educate about 7 per cent of the school age population.

372: The picture elsewhere in the UK is simpler than in England. In Scotland there are 372 secondary schools, all comprehensive in intake. Of these, 53 are faith schools (all Catholic). There are 2,099 primary schools, 318 of which are denominational or faith schools, 314 Catholic, three episcopal and one Jewish.

1,435: In Wales, there are 1,435 primary schools and 222 secondary schools. All the secondary schools are fully comprehensive.

My thanks to the Independent.

From the above it is clear that some schools, e.g. acadamies, even have the power to hire unqualified teachers!!!

GCSE – A Worthless Piece Of Paper

The current mess has been criticised by no less than Professor Alan Smithers, a senior adviser to the Commons Education Select Committee, who said our education system is a ‘liquorice allsorts’ kind of system. He too argues that all children should have an equal opportunity for a good education. At the moment it is clear they do not.

There is but one way for education to go: One standard school system for the UK, and one curriculum for all. Once children have left school, they can go to acadamies to learn specialist subjects. GCSE’s should be hard so that only the most gifted are able to go to university.

Roy.

Britain’s Education System – The Blind Leading The Blind!

Posted in Britain, Children, Conservative Party, David Cameron, England, English Schools, Government, Insanity, Liberal Party, Nick Clegg, Parliament, Primary Education, Teens, UK with tags , , , , , , , , , on 27/06/2011 by floroy1942

“The truth will always out” and that has never been more amply demonstrated than today with the new literacy/numeracy tests for trainee teachers

Education, Education, Education

Education standards in British schools have been falling for decades, thanks in particular to the previous Labour government that made exams easier to improve pass statistics, and now we are ‘paying the piper’. We have long passed the stage where our ‘teachers’, responsible for the proper education of our next generation, are capable of the task.

The horrifying impact of this situation is that it perpetuates. As standards drop generation by generation, so does the competence of succeeding generations of teachers, and thereby the education of each new generation declines. To put it bluntly, how can a semi-literate person teach literacy or numeracy to a child?

This is the vicious circle we are now in as a nation. In my opinion, we are rapidly reaching a point where British children will no longer be able to apply for skilled jobs, and this is already happening. We will eventually see that born and bred British youth will only be able to get jobs as cleaners and road sweepers because their level of education precludes all else. 

See also:

https://floroy1942.wordpress.com/2011/03/05/young-people-today-unemployable/

It is a well known fact that four out of five youngsters leaving school today cannot read and write properly, and don’t even try mental arithmetic!

Teacher Training

Until now, candidates for Teaching Colleges have been allowed to take assessment tests while they train as often as they wish, so if they ‘got lucky’ on their sixth attempt they would be allowed to continue training as teachers! The news item states that candidates will now only be allowed three attempts, but I have to ask; if they need three attempts, are they fit to teach the next generation, especially considering how ‘hard’ the test is? I think not!

The report gave the following examples of questions that appear in the exam given to those attending teacher training:

  • Q1: Teachers organised activities for three classes of 24 pupils and four classes of 28 pupils. What was the total number of pupils involved?

  • Q2: There were no ” ” remarks at the parents’ evening. Is the missing word:

  • a) dissaproving

  • b) disaproveing

  • c) dissapproving

  • d) disapproving?

  • Q3: For a science experiment a teacher needed 95 cubic centimetres of vinegar for each pupil. There were 20 pupils in the class. Vinegar comes in 1,000 cubic centimetre bottles. How many bottles of vinegar were needed?

  • Q4: The children enjoyed the ” ” nature of the task. Is the correct word:

  • a) mathmatical

  • b) mathematical

  • c) mathemmatical

  • d) mathematicall

Answers at the end of this post for those who don’t know!

 Even the questions (faithfully reproduced) have missing punctuation and spelling mistakes, but that may be down to the reporter more than the real exam paper.

While I am on the subject, mistakes are now very common in articles written for news bulletins and newspapers. Whether this is because the writers cannot be bothered to check their work before handing it in, or is the emergence of the level of illiteracy spreading to reporters today I do not know, but its worrying.

A Time When Teachers Knew How To Teach!

When I first saw the above questions, I realised very quickly that they were like the ones I had to answer in school when I was ten years old! That was of course hrrmmm years ago when school was school, and teachers knew what they were doing. In those days teaching was a calling, much like nursing. People did it because they loved the idea of educating the next generation. They knew their subject inside out and woe betide you if you didn’t learn.

The Department of Education calls this exercise ‘toughening up’ on education, and Ed Gove, the Education Secretary is quoted as saying  the proposals would “emphasise our commitment to boosting the status of the profession by toughening up the recruitment process and ensuring that all new teachers have a real depth of knowledge in their subject”. That was the ‘norm’ fifty years ago for cryin’ out loud!!! I know my old teachers would be spinning in their graves if they could see what is happening today!

The tests taken are for literacy and numeracy, both essential if you wish to embark on a career educating others. To date, 10% of all applicants take the numeracy test more then three times, and 7%  do the same for the literacy test. Although the news rules may well help, I still do not see the need for candidates to be given three attempts at a test. Would you get three attempts at a GCSE? No!

Hmmm!

So what do we have now? For the most part, teachers who can only stand in front of a class and recite a lesson from a book, and why? Because they themselves have little or no knowledge of the subject they are ‘teaching’. In some cases their literacy and numeracy are no better than a twelve-year-olds, which lets face it, is considered ‘normal’ these days.

The reaction to this report from the National Union of Teachers (NUT) is predictable. In their opinion the tests are ‘superfluous’. That just about sums them up too! According to them the students requiring more than one shot at these test were either dyslexic, had English as a second language or were unfamiliar with on-line testing. My Goodness! How can a dyslexic person, or a foreigner with insufficient understanding of english, be allowed to teach our young????? It boggles the mind!

Christine Blower

NUT General Secretary Christine Blower said: “The NUT has always argued that the entry requirements for initial teacher education, which include GCSE passes grade C or above in English and maths, should be sufficient and make the additional skills tests superfluous,”

If that is the case, why do so many have to take the test more than once to pass it! Especially when you consider how simple the questions are. GCSE’s have been dumbed down by Labour over the past decade to such an extent I am surprised everyone doesn’t have at least ten! So Christine, You can blow…never mind!

The National Association of Head Teachers has, as you can expect, a more professional attitude to the current problem saying: “it was right to have demanding expectations of recruits to the profession”. Now that sounds more like it!

The Associations General Secretary, Russell Hobby, said: “We should not fall into the trap of thinking, however, that academic excellence necessarily makes someone a great teacher. We want smart people, but we also want visionary, caring, energetic, creative and thoughtful people.” Quite right Sir, up to a point! Without the basic knowledge of the subject they are to teach, the rest is meaningless. All potential candidates should be properly examined for their level of general education and long before they enter the system, not while they are in the midst of training.

Let Me Check That In My Notes

Unless the government makes severe changes to the level of competence of our new teachers, and makes it compulsory for them to have a full understanding and knowledge of any subject they wish to teach, things will never improve and we will end up a with a workforce capable of performing menial tasks only. Whenever companies need skilled workers they will have to be imported. Not a happy thought.

Answers to the test questions: 1. 184     2. d     3. 2     4. b     Just in case you may have had some difficulty.

Associated post:

https://floroy1942.wordpress.com/2009/06/20/its-not-mi-falt-i-carnt-spel/

Roy.

Young People Today Unemployable?

Posted in Benefits, Britain, Budget Cuts, Child Discipline, Children, England, English Schools, Equality, Government, Human Rights, Immigration, Insanity, Modern World, MP's, Parenting, Parliament, Political Correctness, Primary Education, Primary Schools, Teen alcohol abuse, Teen Violence, Teens, UK with tags , , , , , , , , , on 05/03/2011 by floroy1942

It will come as a surprise to many that UK business people consider most of our youth unemployable.

According to the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), 76% of executives agreed that young people lack the skills necessary for today’s business world, and not surprisingly, they blame the education system in the UK. They claim the country is heading for a significant skills crisis that will eventually damage the economy.

Their main concerns are young people’s lack of discipline and poor timekeeping (61%), a shortage of workplace skills (63%), and a bad attitude coupled with lack of ambition (66%). Naturally, this does not apply to all young people.

Sign of the Times?

I for one do not subscribe to blaming only the education system for the current crisis, as I consider modern social attitudes a major contributor. We are deeply entrenched in a period in history when our youth often requires, and is given, everything handed to them on a plate, and more importantly, many consider it their right! Sad as it may be, that is the general consensus of opinion among much of our misbegotten youth of today. Ever heard the phrase “I want it, and I want it  now!!!”

Children today have become so privileged they don’t need to do a darned thing to earn the things they want: “I had to buy my son a computer because all his friends have one!!!” – Sound familiar? I heard this from a close friend.

Friends of ours have a three-year-old girl who has so many toys, their house looks like a toy store. When received she plays with them for a few minutes and then they lie untouched, and if this continues, and it probably will, how is the child ever to value anything in the future?

This sort of thing has led to the attitude we see in many today who believe life owes them a good living. This is the fault of the parents alone, who must bear responsibility for this current viewpoint among some of today’s young people.

Exam Time – But I Know I’ll Pass!

To be sure, the poor standards of education are just another nail in the coffin if you will, for there is little doubt that standards have dropped drastically over the past three decades. The previous Labour government was to blame by continually making exams easier in an effort to massage the pass rates for GCSE’s etc. If you want to look good in the eyes of the public and show how well the education system is doing,  just lower the pass rate until everybody passes!

This attitude may have made the government look good, but when I see the levels of English in many of today’s young people it makes me shudder. They have been let down badly by the education system, for by far the greater majority are now semi-literate by old standards. They can’t spell for toffee, and as for putting a dozen words together to make an intelligent sentence, forget it! Have you ever seen ‘Teen Speak’?

You may be interested in a blog I wrote some time ago on this subject:

https://floroy1942.wordpress.com/2009/06/20/its-not-mi-falt-i-carnt-spel/

As a further example, take a look at the comments some people post on web page news items and you will see what I mean! Sometimes even the news items themselves show disgraceful errors.

See What I Mean?

In my opinion, not all problems within the education system can be laid at the door of government, for another contributing factor is the extremely poor standard of teachers. Many are hired before they are even qualified.

In my day, a teacher knew his subject inside out and you could ask any question and get a proper answer, today however, it seems some teachers do nothing more than quote from the lesson material book with little understanding of the subject in depth. Should some enterprising student ask a question they have to “look it up”.

I apologize in advance to those dedicated individuals in the teaching profession who do not fall into this group, for I know full well there are good teachers out there.

Yet one more facet to this saga is the interference of the ‘Bleeding Hearts’ Brigade (Human Rights/Politically Correct idiots) in our education system. Along with the collusion of a weak government of the time, they successfully stamped out any form of discipline in our schools by having laws passed that forbid any form of punishment for not paying attention, disrupting classes or even refusing to learn.

Physical Attacks a Daily Occurrence

Over the past two decades, more than 50% of teachers have at some time or other been attacked in the classroom by unruly pupils, some even with a knife! This is an intolerable situation, even more so because the current laws forbid any form of punishment. These same laws have given us a legacy of undisciplined youth that knows it cannot be touched, and feeds the rate of illiteracy like nothing else for they cannot be bothered to learn in school.

The Future For Many

There is without doubt a huge shock awaiting many of the current generation when they finally leave school and try to get a job. You can be fairly certain that too many will swell the queues outside the local Dole Office for they will be unemployable in anything but menial tasks.

So, because of our lack of foresight in educating and disciplining our young, we are creating a huge future burden on the Welfare System that may well be unsustainable. Not only that, and far more dangerous, we will become dependent on importing those with the necessary skills to work in industry, while our own people do the menial jobs that require no qualifications or skills.

The big problem is, can we go back to how it should be? I think not for it is next to impossible to go back!

Roy.

The UK Education System Just Got Worse (If that’s possible).

Posted in Britain, Child Discipline, Children, England, English Schools, Government, Immigrants, Modern World, MP's, Parenting, Parliament, Political Correctness, Primary Education, Primary Schools, Religion, Teen Violence, Teens, UK, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on 09/12/2010 by floroy1942

The OECD

The system of education in Britain has been declining for years, so it is no big surprise that it fell from 17th position to 25th in world rankings in the last OECD survey completed in 2006.

It is no secret that today an estimated 4 out of 5 children in the UK cannot read or write correctly when they leave school. For a few moments, take the time to look at news items on the web and read comments on articles sent in by members of the public (A mild example: “OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thats a big fat joke wot the hell is this county getting like???”). It’s probably true that some reading this blog will find nothing wrong with this comment. Among a fair majority, the standard of written English is abysmal to say the least.

Is this an indictment of the government, the education system, the children, or their parents? To me it is more likely a combination of them all, but with some more prominent than others.

The 'Iron Lady'

Let us take first the government. Ever since Maggie Thatcher left the Whitehall ‘throne’ there has been a steadily increasing number of budget cuts to education. All the school playing fields, where children got their daily exercise through sport, have been sold off for urban development due to government cost-cutting. This is part of the reason why we have so many obese children today. Many school buildings have been declared ‘unfit for purpose’ due to an increasing lack of money for maintenance, and as for building new schools, forget it!

The Devious Duo

The education system itself has not fared any better. Since Labour came to power under Tony Blair, we have seen a continual lowering of the pass levels by way of making exam questions easier in school examinations (2+2 =? Select one of the following: 4, 4, 4, 4). This was the Labour governments answer to falling pass rates among pupils. Typical of the idiots we called a government; if insufficient people cannot get over the barrier, then lower it. It was a quick and easy fix which compensated for an inefficient education system, poor teaching methods, and made them look good.

It is also a sad fact that the national curriculum, as well as exams, have been greatly modified (or toned down if you wish), to accomodate the ever increasing number of immigrants that entered our schools during the Blair era. Instead of requiring immigrant children to learn english, we are now teaching in their language in some schools, causing disruption and chaos. It is just another indication of how we are pandering to the ever increasing demands of immigrants instead of insisting they adopt to our ways.

Generally speaking, teachers today are of a very poor standard with insufficient knowledge to teach properly without a teaching guide in front of them. This is in part due to indifferent teacher training, and in part to the significant lowering of standards over the years.

That standards have dropped, no-one in their right minds can deny.

It is also sad to note that many of the subjects I took as a boy, like history, geography and religion are ‘skimmed-over’, or no longer taught for they have become irrelevant in today’s ‘modern society’.

But history is the backbone of  patriotism, and because we no longer teach children the rich history of our nation, the only thing that brings out our patriotic spirit is football. A very poor substitute.

Ask kids today where Malawi is and they have never heard of it, unless it was on the TV for some reason. Religion is all but dying out among the young people of Britain today to the extent that many no longer consider it necessary to get married, even when they have a child. Once the old people are gone the church and its teachings will probably die a slow death.

To many, teaching is no longer a ‘calling’ but just a job, and this is evident in the fact that many teachers today do little more than recite from the lesson material rather than have a deep knowledge of the subject themselves. I call it parrot training!

As I say all this, I do realise that it does not apply to all, and there are still dedicated teachers out there who do their level best for the students in their charge, within the constraints of the insanity that governs British schools that is.

Another  major contributing factor is the removal of all forms of discipline a teacher may use against disruptive pupils. Gone are the days when you could be sent to the headmaster’s office for ‘six-of-the-best’ with the cane if you misbehaved, now a teacher has to put up with not only verbal abuse, but also physical violence from pupils. It was claimed recently that as many as 4 out of 5 teachers had been assaulted by their pupils at some time or another.

This brings us to the children themselves. Over the past three generations or so children have become more assertive and aggressive, a fact attributable to the steady erosion of all forms of discipline brought about by the ‘elf & safety’ and ‘uman rights’ groups that infest modern life. These self-righteous individuals have become the plague of our times, but to date, no government has had the balls to put them in their place, instead they have pampered them.

Caring Parents - Not Always!

In my opinion, the parents are also to blame for the lack of proper education in that many, if not most, do not have time or inclination to become involved in their off-springs education. Ask many and you will get the reply: “That’s wot schools are 4”!

These people do not realise that they also bear responsibility for their children’s learning by making sure they grow up as responsible human beings and have respect for their teachers and all others. If there is no discipline in the home how can there be any in school!

A Once Proud Nation

There is little doubt that the British have declined so far in stature from the days of empire, that we have become the laughing stock of most countries in the world. It is time to turn our efforts inward and stop trying to impress the rest of the world while we sort out the mess that has become Not So’ Great Britain.

Unless radical action is taken to restore high standards of teaching, discipline in schools, and respect among the young, we will soon find ourselves lower on the international education table than the poorest African states.

What makes it really sad, is that sometime in the not too distant future there will be no skilled English workforce if the education standards are not improved. In such a case we, the British, will be relying on immigrants to fill skilled jobs because our own people are fit only as unskilled labour. That may sound like an exaggeration, but who is to say it is impossible. We constantly ‘import’ skilled labour in some sectors already.

It will take a government with balls to carry out such radical change in thinking and practice within our education system. The problem is, how long will we have to wait before one comes along?

Roy.


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