Archive for aviation

Having A Bad Day? This Will Cheer You Up!

Posted in America, Australia, Britain, Canada, Europe, Modern World, News, Spain, UK, USA with tags , , , , on 23/10/2014 by floroy1942

Feeling stressed? Then you need to unwind and let it all go. I hope the following will help and make your day just that little bit better.

Cartoon

This elderly lady went to the doctor for a check-up. Everything checked out fine. The old lady pulled the doctor to the side and said, “Doctor, I haven’t had sex for years now and I was wondering how I can increase my husband’s sex drive.”

The doctor smiled and said, “Have you tried to give him Viagra?” The lady frowned. “Doctor, I can’t even get him to take aspirin when he has a headache,” she claimed.

“Well,” the doctor continued, “Let me suggest something. Crush the Viagra into a powder. When you are giving him coffee, stir it into the coffee and serve it. He won’t notice a thing.” The old lady was delighted. She left the doctor’s office quickly.

Weeks later the old lady returned. She was frowning and the doctor asked her what was wrong. She shook her head.

“How did it go?” the doctor asked. “Terrible, doctor, terrible” the old lady replied.

“Did it not work?” said the doctor.

“Yes,” the old lady said, “It worked. I did as you said and he got up and ripped his clothes off right then and there and we made mad love on the table. It was the best sex that I’d had in 25 years.” “Then what is the problem, ma’am?” the doctor asked.

“Well,” she said. “I can’t ever show my face in McDonald’s again.”

Cartoon

A college teacher reminds her class of tomorrow’s final exam. “Now class, I won’t tolerate any excuses for you not being here tomorrow. I might consider a nuclear attack or a serious personal injury or illness, or a death in your immediate family, but that’s it, no other excuses whatsoever!”

A smart-ass guy in the back of the room raised his hand and asked, “What would you say if tomorrow I said I was suffering from complete and utter sexual exhaustion?”

The entire class is reduced to laughter and snickering. When silence was restored, the teacher smiled knowingly at the student, shaking her head and sweetly said, “Well, I guess you’d have to write the exam with your other hand.”

Cartoon

Two Irishmen flew to Canada on a hunting trip. They chartered a small plane to take them into the Rockies for a week hunting moose. They managed to bag six. As they were loading the plane to return, the pilot said the plane could take only four moose.

The two lads objected strongly. “Last year we shot six. The pilot let us take them all and he had the same plane as yours.” Reluctantly, the pilot gave in and all six were loaded. The plane took off.

However, while attempting to cross some mountains, even on full power the little plane couldn’t handle the load and went down. Somehow, surrounded by the moose bodies, only Paddy and Mick survived the crash.

After climbing out of the wreckage, Paddy asked Mick, “Any idea where we are?” Mick looked around him: “I think we’re pretty close to where we crashed last year.”

Cartoon

A guy walks into a coffee shop and asks the waitress: “How much is the coffee?” “Coffee is four dollars” the waitress says. “How much is a refill?” the man asks. “Free,” says the waitress. “Then I’ll take a refill!” the man responds.

Have a nice Day!

Roy.

The Lost Spitfires Of Burma

Posted in Britain, England, Europe, Germany, Royal Air Force, Royal Navy, UK, World War 2 with tags , , , , , on 29/11/2012 by floroy1942

Once in a while its nice to write about something positive, for as we all know, there are few opportunities for this today. While the world and its people are getting crazier by the minute it was refreshing to find a news story that piques the imagination and does not involve disaster, corruption, hunger or death. I refer to an amazing tale and one man’s quest to unearth buried Spitfires in the jungles of Burma.

David Cundall

There are few of these iconic aircraft flying these days so long after the end of the Second World War, but if luck is with David Cundall this may change. He is a farmer and aviation enthusiast who for sixteen years has been researching the events of the time, and in particular the area around Mingaladon in Burma where it is said that 36 of these aircraft were buried in the jungle sometime during 1945. He is sure that two other sites contain as many as another 24 aircraft.

Boxing A Spitfire – Burma 1945

They had arrived at an airfield in the region in crates and were never unpacked or assembled, and for some reason orders were handed down to bury them as they were, maybe to prevent them falling into Japanese hands although this is doubtful. The real reason may never be known but for Mr, Cundall there is evidence enough that they exist. He has over the past few years assembled a team that have been combing the jungle and interviewing anyone who might have had knowledge of the event, and with some success. He met with a local Burmese man who remembered how, as a 15-year-old, he and his father had transported timber used when the Spitfires were buried.

1940 – Attacking The Bomber Stream

To date, electro-magnetic surveys have uncovered  two areas of interest to the team, and it is expected that work to excavate them will begin in January. His greatest wish is to take them back to England and restore them to flying condition. He said he would love to see a squadron of Spitfires flying over London again, and that is a dream held by many, myself included. Being an aviator for 45 years, he said he would love the opportunity to fly one himself, and who can blame him.

Spitfire Prototype – 5 March 1936

The Supermarine Spitfire was the brainchild of R. J. Mitchell who was chief designer at the Supermarine Aviation Works which since 1928 had operated as a subsidiary of the Vickers Armstrong company. First test flown on March 6 1936 the Spitfire underwent several changes before entering into squadron service with 19 Squadron at RAF Duxford on the 4th August 1938. Throughout the duration of the war the aircraft served in Britain and on the Continent, the Middle East and the Far East, and many were crated and sent to the Russians for use on their front.

Heartbeat Of The Spitfire

The power plant of this superb aircraft was the Rolls Royce Merlin V-12 that was first developed in the early 1930’s and underwent successive changes until it was ready for the Spitfire. The Merlin was the most successful wartime engine in British aviation during the war years, being fitted not only to the Spitfire, but also the Avro Lancaster, the Handley Page Halifax, the De Havilland Mosquito and the Hawker Hurricane.

Heading For The Enemy

The successes of the Spitfire are unparalleled in aviation history, for although built as a fighter it also carried out the roles of photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and carrier-based aircraft. This aircraft also claimed many speed and altitude records in its time. The Spitfire will always be associated with Battle of Britain, and although the Hawker Hurricane did as much sterling work as the Spitfire during those treacherous  months, it is always the Spitfire that immediately springs to people’s minds when that time in British history is mentioned. This fine veteran of war flew its last flight for the RAF on 9th June 1957 and although many remained airborne around the world, now, 67 years after the war, they are very scarce, so I wish David Cundall lots of luck in his quest to unearth what might be a ‘new generation’ of this venerable war machine.

Roy.

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