The Blame Passing Game

It was a surprise to read that the parents of a girl who went to join ISIS a year ago are blaming the government for their daughter enticing three teenagers who have been missing for a week to join her.

The three girls, Kadiza Sultana, 16, Shamima Begum and Amira Abase, 15 were last seen on CCTV at Gatwick Airport and are thought to be on their way to join ISIS. They  told their parents they were going out for the day and disappeared, but it is now known they took a flight to Turkey, a staging post for those heading to Syria, and ISIS.

Aqsa Mahmood

Aqsa Mahmood

The daughter of the parents making the complaint, Aqsa Mahmood aged 20, left her family home to become a ‘Jihadi Bride’, and has been in Syria for about a year. It is thought she was in contact with the three missing girls via the internet and persuaded them to join her.

In a statement the family said, “The UK’s security services have serious questions to answer. Aqsa’s social media has been monitored since she disappeared over a year ago, yet despite alleged contact between the girls and Aqsa, they failed to stop them from leaving the UK to Turkey, a staging post for Syria. Sadly, despite all the government’s rhetoric on Isis, if they can’t even take basic steps to stop children leaving to join ISIS, what is the point of any new laws?” My reply to that is, what did they do to prevent their daughter going to Syria?

Misguided Youth

Misguided Youth

Currently it is estimated that some 50-60 women/teenagers have travelled from the UK to join the jihadists and that number is expected to grow. On arrival they join others from a range of countries, including the US, Austria, France, the Netherlands, Canada, Norway and Sweden.

Most of the contact is via social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter etc, where they are offered advice, support, and help with travel. These websites are a source of propaganda for ISIS that presents idealised notions of an Islamic life and jihad. Once there they are quickly married off to jihadist fighters and some have even taken up arms and become fighters themselves.

But to get back to my opening statement, I do find it extremely presumptuous of the parents of Aqsa Mahmood to blame the government for these defections to ISIS. It gives the impression that they themselves bear no responsibility whatsoever for their daughters actions. I disagree with that most strongly, for in my opinion they have no-one to blame but themselves and should accept full responsibility.

Take A Lesson From This If You Are A Parent

Take A Lesson From This If You Are A Parent

The government does not bring up children, does not teach them right from wrong. That is all down to the parents and them alone. It is they who are solely responsible for raising their child in the right way, and had they done that she would not now be with ISIS. Insofar as the religion is concerned, it is also the duty of the Imams in the mosques to do their part in teaching these young people that Jihad is not the correct path.

The parents contend that the government should have stopped her from travelling to Syria, but what they forget is, the government does not have the legal right to prevent someone getting on a plane if they are over eighteen and have committed no crime. Plus the fact, why should the government be watching what every Muslim teenager does just in case they are going to join ISIS?

William Hague

William Hague

Leader of the House of Commons and ex-Foreign Secretary William Hague said during an interview, “More has to be done by all of us to stop vulnerable youngsters from being radicalized. From families, from mosques, religious leaders and of course the government we have all been very busy in communicating the dangers of travelling to Syria.” He went on to say, “There’s been a lot of criticism over the last year of the government doing too much surveillance and it’s been difficult to get agreement on powers to update the government’s powers to intercept communications. This can be an example of why it is necessary to be able to do that in some cases.”

It just goes to show you can’t have it both ways. You cannot blame to government for these people travelling to Syria on the one hand, and then blame it for being too intrusive when it monitors communications to find them before they leave!

Naughty Child

Naughty Child

It is all too common these days where children in general seldom get taught right from wrong. All too often the kids are left to their own devices just so long as they are quiet and out from under their parents feet. In very many cases today the idea of teaching them respect, morality and honesty from an early age is as foreign as a Muslim taking Holy Communion.

But such is the state of parenting today, that children get led onto the wrong path in life and their parents know nothing about it until the crap hits the fan. Then they are all too ready to blame someone else for their own failings.

In my view, if all these teenagers had been brought up properly this would not have happened, and they would still be at home looking forward to a fruitful and productive life.

Roy.

2 Responses to “The Blame Passing Game”

  1. Alfie Says:

    yeah I find the parents kind of foolish and out of line on this one. Seriously isn’t the whole concept of going to Syria or Iraq to be with ISIL kind of like the warning on a pack of cigarettes.
    “I’m going to a war zone where people are getting beaten and killed,what could go wrong”?
    I say let it happen,its a variant of Darwinism. Just don’t let them back in!

    Like

    • Hi Alfie welcome back.
      Yes I agree one hundred percent. For sure these silly girls have no idea what awaits them when they get there.
      Best Regards,
      Roy.

      Like

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